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7 Best Spots to see the Northern Lights in Scandinavia

https://www.flickr.com/photos/visitfinland/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/visitfinland/

Scandinavia is by far the most spectacular place to witness Aurora Borealis. The northern lights are most abundant in high latitude climates, which marks Finland, Sweden and Norway as an Aurora hotspot. Surrounded by picturesque landscapes, the best viewing months are during the cold winter between late September and March. When searching for Aurora Borealis, look no further than these seven spots in Scandinavia.

Juhannuskallio, Finland

https://www.flickr.com/photos/strolicfurlan/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/strolicfurlan/

Juhannuskallio, or “Midsummer Cliff,” is a small town on the top of Ounasvaara Hill. Known for its midsummer parties, Juhannuskallio turns into an Aurora hotspot during the winter months. Outdoor enthusiasts hit the snowy landscapes in search of a light show. One-night Aurora tour packages are available for sledging, snow shoeing, Nordic skiing or nature tour bussing. If you are looking to renew your spirit, walk with a Nordic shaman on Ruka.fl’s “Spirit of Nature” tour deep into the forest and to sleep under the stars.

Finnish Lapland

https://www.flickr.com/photos/visitfinland/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/visitfinland/

Lapland is the northern region of Finland. Here, 24 hours of darkness rules the sky. It is estimated that the northern lights make an appearance approximately 200 nights during the winter months. Although not guaranteed, the odds are better here than anywhere else in Scandinavia.

North Cape, Norway

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trondk/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trondk/

Known as Nordkapp to the locals, North Cape is northern Scandinavia’s most popular destination. The North Cape is a 1,000-foot cliff and is marked the northern most point of Europe. A quarter of a million tourists visit annually, many coming to view Aurora Borealis during the winter months. Light searchers hike the snow-covered mountains and cliffs with hopes of a show on a clear night.

Senja, Norway

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cfaobam/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/cfaobam/

Senja is Norway’s second largest island. The untouched landscapes make this a popular spot for Aurora landscape photographers. Here, the light veils across mountainsides and reflects in the lake, making it one of the most breathtaking experiences in life.

Alta, Norway

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trondk/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/trondk/

Known for its frequent Aurora visits, Alta was one of the first spots to open a northern light observatory. Alta is popular for its Igloo hotel, husky sledding and skiing adventures, all of which shines light on an epic Aurora Borealis experience.

Abisko National Park, Sweden

https://www.flickr.com/photos/edeuzo/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/edeuzo/

Located several kilometers north of Kiruna, Abisko is one of the best places in Sweden. Free from light pollution, this national park contains a scientifically proven “blue hole.” This means a patch of sky remains clear despite forecast predictions. Guided northern light tours are available and backcountry camping and trekking into the wilderness are popular. Visit the Aurora Sky Station for a grand view of the park and the sky.

Porjus, Sweden

https://www.flickr.com/photos/claudiaregina_cc/

https://www.flickr.com/photos/claudiaregina_cc/

This tiny 400-resident village is located in Swedish Lapland, north of the Arctic Circle. Porjus itself is a good spot as it has little light pollution. A popular retreat is to rent a lakeside flat for a front row view of the sky. For a clear sky, visit one of the nearby national parks: Sarrus, Muddus, Stora Sjöfallet or Padeljant.

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